Ingrid Hindell, IDPwD 2020.

Ingrid Hindell is physically disabled due to Cerebral Palsy but this has not stopped her from having a zest for life, for completing many courses, being on many committees and being a social advocate. She states “I’ve found the various stages in my life being a journey of continuous growth towards self-acceptance. This is thanks to the help and support of many wonderful people including my husband Robert.” Today is International Day for People with Disability.

Ingrid has developed a free self help course which is available here: https://www.facebook.com/There-is-no-one-to-blame-Not-even-ourselves-837939196242993

Ingrid migrated to Australia from Sri Lanka over half a century ago.  In 1997 she moved from Melbourne to Geelong. She has an organic vegetable garden, appreciates a good diet and complementary medicine.

Ingrid has organized a project about Sexuality and Choice for people with disabilities. She has facilitated workshops and discussions on topics ranging from assertiveness to basic nutrition, at various organizations like Yooralla, Scope, Leisure Networks and Deakin Uni and Gordon TAFE, for staff and other consumers. She has presented papers at several National Conferences including the Uniting Church, the Australian Society of Sex Therapists (ASSERT), and the “Whole Health Institute”, a network of medical/health and lay practitioners “who value integrity and foster whole person care”.  She has also sat on numerous committees in Geelong and Melbourne advocating on various issues to improve the life of herself and other people with disabilities.

Ingrid is a member of “Unity” (which, in her opinion, disseminates and celebrates a blend of the world’s best psycho/spiritual teachings,); Geelong’s Sustainability Group; and the Geelong Interfaith Network for whom she does some data processing on their Website’s “Events” section as well as their Facebook page.

“I am concerned that basic things like Melbourne’s Traveller’s Aid service that will make the whole community more accessible, will not be funded, and that this will severely limit the success of the NDIS, but I am always speaking out about these things. I am also concerned for those women who cannot speak up for themselves- they may not get the support they rightfully deserve.

“The most important tip I have for other women accessing the NDIS is ‘to be more assertive and/or get a good advocate.’”

International Day of People with Disability (IDPwD) is held on 3 December each year.

IDPwD is a United Nations observed day celebrated internationally. It aims to increase public awareness, understanding and acceptance of people with disability and celebrate their achievements and contributions.

Story: Jacqui Bennett. Photo: supplied